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2014/03/23

Firewood!!

I have a lot of pine trees that were cut down a few years ago just sitting where the best sunlight is. So they need to go, I also am trading spilt firewood with friends. The logs are 20'+ long and range from 4" to 12" wide. They are stacked on top of each other. So I need to cut them down to fireplace size.
I was browsing a Northern Tool and Equipment catalog (great Tool Porn!) and came across the TimberJack. It's a handy device that lifts one end of the log off the ground so you can easily cut it.
Here's the one I bought:
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200612316_200612316
And some pics from the web site:




And how I am using it:


Now if you notice the store web site, they are lifting a short log, which is dumb, you want to cut the log on the air side (not touching the ground), otherwise your saw binds on you. But it's quite easy to cut off the air side until you get down to the timerbjack. Then you need to lower the log, move the timberjack down, raise the log, and repeat.

I'm using a 14" Homelite 9amp electric chainsaw to do all the cutting. Works well, not the fastest saw, but it's light and get the job done.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Homelite-14-in-9-Amp-Electric-Chainsaw-UT43103A/202723256



The chainsaw cost me $50 and the timberjack was $45 with $15 or so shipping.
It's a great inexpensive setup. Now I just need to get a 800watt Whistler inverter and see how it runs the saw.

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